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Press releases

Prof. Dr. Peter Hegemann receives Otto Warburg Medal 2018

The Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and Elsevier/BBA honour the biophysicist for his research in the area of light-induced ion channels.

Mosbach, 23 March 2018: Prof. Dr. Peter Hegemann from the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin has been awarded the Otto Warburg Medal 2018. The Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) as well as its cooperation partners, the information analytics company Elsevier and  Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) journals, honoured the professor for experimental biophysics for his breakthrough research in the area of light-activated ion channels.

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Prof. Dr. Stefan Jentsch posthumously receives Otto-Warburg-Medal 2017

The Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM), Elsevier, and BBA honor the cell biologist for his groundbreaking research on the ubiquitin system

Bochum, 25 September 2017: Yesterday, for the first time in its long history, the Otto-Warburg-Medal was awarded posthumously to Prof. Dr. Stefan Jentsch. With the well-renowned science award, the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and its partners, information analytics company Elsevier and Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA), recognized the cell biologist’s research on the protein ubiquitin and its role as a molecular switch in a variety of cellular processes.

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Prof. Emmanuelle Charpentier receives Otto-Warburg-Medal 2016

The Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) honors the French microbiologist for her groundbreaking findings on the treatment of genetic and chronic diseases.

Mosbach, 1. April 2016:  Today, Prof. Emmanuelle Charpentier was awarded the Otto-Warburg-Medal. The Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) together with its cooperation partners Elsevier and Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, (BBA) honored Prof. Charpentier with the renowned science award for the development of the CRISPR-Cas9-system as a tool for the editing of genetic material and for further research on the functions of genes. The method developed by Charpentier, which allows the correction of defective DNA sequences, can serve the development of treatment options for diseases. The scientist receives a prize money of 25.000 Euro, which is intended to cover her further research work.

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